Millennials May Whine, But We Definitely Wine!

September marks the end of summer and the start of the busy school season. For most, this means a packed schedule, hectic mornings – the works, but did you know it’s nearly mandatory to enjoy a glass of California wine? Most Millennials will be partaking, but that’s only because wine has become their new drink of choice.

September marks the start of California Wine Month and as most Gen Y-ers head back to campus, it’s more than likely you’ll find a bottle of vino in the kitchen. In light of the recent earthquake Northern California experienced, it’s a better time than ever to support wineries from the Napa Valley, in particular.

Source:

Source: www.discovercaliforniawines.com

Ronan Stafford, Canadean Wine Report analyst, helped Jezebel break down the statistics for this story:

Millennials above the legal drinking age guzzled up 25.7 percent of wine by volume in the U.S. in 2012. This is higher than the global average of 20.6, but lower than the 41.4 percent of wine by volume consumed by U.S. citizens aged 55 and up.

Additionally, Melissa Saunders, owner of the wine importer, Communal Brands says:

“Historically, wine has been marketed to older generations and came with a huge pretense. But this generation is blowing all of that out of the water. They don’t care about the pretentiousness of a wine, they want something that is authentic and speaks to them. This is a huge marketing opportunity.

Source: www.enjoyart.com

Source: www.enjoyart.com

Wine has traditionally been viewed as a classy, refined drink – not necessarily one marketed towards college students. However, times (and tastes) are changing and the wine industry is making new and creative adjustments to appeal to their new audience. Although some argue the wine industry is one step behind in their marketing schemes, 20 million Gen Y-ers have yet to turn 21, so better late than never to get started.

A recent article from CNBC featured an Oregon winery seeking “this real interaction between form and function”and it’s packaging pinot noir in a can. The wine costs $6 per can (or $24 for a four-pack) currently available on the Union Wine Co website as well as in stores in Rhode Island, Maryland/Washington D.C., Ohio, Illinois, California, Hawaii and Oregon.

“We’re certainly focused on keeping it real and removing the pretense that surrounds wine,” said Ryan Harms, owner and winemaker of the Union Wine Co. The winery is based in Tualatin, Oregon, roughly 30 minutes outside Portland. “While all that ceremony may be good and attract a group of consumers, it can be off-putting and can keep new consumers from entering the wine category.

Source: unionwinecompany.com

Source: unionwinecompany.com

Will you be grabbing a can of pinot?

 

Cannes You Taste It?

A few weeks ago, I was lucky enough to attend the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity that celebrates the most amazing marketing campaigns from around the globe. As part of a Ketchum creative crew sent to soak it all in and report back the best creative morsels to colleagues and clients, I traveled to France hungry for some new inspiration.

What I actually found was that some of the most beautiful examples of creativity were not formally competing. Instead, they were found in the window displays and on the dessert menus of the best the French Riviera had to offer. Here are my top three favorite purveyors of works of edible art that I was lucky enough to experience:

Chocolate treasure boxes, Jean Luc Pele.

Stop #1 – Jean Luc Pele, a local chocolatier, designs the most beautiful chocolate creations I have ever seen. From the treasure chests filled with tiny delicacies to the macaron towers constructed with every flavor in the rainbow to the flowing chocolate fountain wall, there is no way a passer-by could resist. Each day, I allowed myself two macarons, coercing myself to choose one from their sweet collection and one from the salted collection. Caramel with sea salt is all you need to know, period. Check out the gorgeous menu items at http://www.jeanlucpele.com/fr. [Read more…]

Eating My Way Through Asia: The Photos

Recently, I was lucky enough to travel to Asia on behalf of Ketchum, both as a global scholar and as a trainer of our planning process, RISC.  In a whirlwind of a month, I went through Singapore, Mumbai, Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. When people ask about the experience, I point to the photos, which are mostly of food, naturally. Food is important within all cultures but it takes new heights in Asia. There, food is a manifestation of your persona – your heritage, your hometown, your ability to provide for your family, your graciousness towards a guest in your care. In India alone, I was astounded at the nuances of completely different cuisine belonging to certain regions of India – never again will I order “Indian” and not question if it’s North Indian or Gujarati, to name just two of many.

Here, I take you through my top food experiences, as seen through a selection of my personal photos.

Conveyor Belt Sushi, Singapore
Conveyor Belt Sushi: Though this has certainly hit the US before as a novelty thing, the complete normalcy of this experience in a Singapore mall is what struck me. Why wouldn’t one endlessly grab new dishes off a fast moving belt? For variety-addicts like me, this was one exciting meal (and one that could’ve gone on forever).

[Read more…]

Going Green in Frankfurt

One of the most delightful surprises of my recent trip to Europe was the city of Frankfurt, a crossroads of culture, architecture and amazing food.

Schriber-Heynes Proletariat, Frankfurt

Schriber-Heynes Proletariat, Frankfurt

Natalie Haut, my host from Ketchum’s Frankfurt office, treated me to the incomparable experience of eating at one of Frankfurt’s famed apfelwein (apple wine) restaurants, Schreiber-Heynes Proletariat. We sat at a long, scarred wooden table, which probably dated back to the 1870s when the restaurant first opened, and had jugs of apfelwein with delicious, coarse German bread.

[Read more…]

Dakar, Senegal’s First Restaurant Week Is Worth Checking Out

Restaurant weeks have been a part of foodie culture for as long as anyone can remember. Even so, these highly anticipated annual events are generally only thought of as something that happens in the world’s more well-known food-centric cities: New York, London, San Francisco, Paris…

The truth is, there are food lovers everywhere. Afua Hirsch wrote for The Guardian about foodies in Ghana, and this week, Senegal joined the ranks of foodie cities with the first ever Dakar Restaurant Week.

Dakar Restaurant Week founders Shruti Dhanda (l) and Diarra Gueye, hard at work

Dakar Restaurant Week founders Shruti Dhanda (l) and Diarra Gueye, hard at work

Dakar Restaurant Week (DRW) founders Shruti and Diarra met during college in Minnesota, but they couldn’t have come from more diverse backgrounds. Diarra, Senegalese by birth, moved to Norway as a teenager to attend school, and Shruti is originally from India, but grew up in the Philippines. They both quit their high-flying jobs in Los Angeles and New York to follow what makes them truly happy, and much of their joy is centered around food. For Diarra, Senegalese culture is all about eating out and dressing up. “You’ll go broke,” she says, “but it’s our culture.” At the same time, Senegalese people have reservations about eating out. “Saying that you’re going to a restaurant is like saying that you’re taking a trip to Vegas. It’s seen as something that’s for the very rich,” Shruti explains, adding that DRW is a way of showing that food at high-quality restaurants is accessible for Dakar’s middle class. [Read more…]

Top 10 Food & Dining Trends in Moscow

Editor’s Note: While most of the world debates the likely medalists at the Sochi Games, we foodies will be asking an equally important question. Tell us, tell us PLEASE, what in the heck is everyone eating over there and how can we replicate it at home? Our Ketchum colleagues graciously obliged our tantrums and now you, too, can be in-the-know if someone asks you to bring some “Herring Under a Fur Coat” to their Opening Ceremony party. I hope you’ll enjoy learning more about Russian cuisine today and in the weeks to come. Amy

2013 was a remarkable year in the world of food and dining in Moscow and people are still talking about food trend predictions for 2014. We are no astrologists, so instead spent the past days examining the current top 10 trends in Russian food and dining. Who knows? With a little help from the Sochi Olympics, some predictions might become the next global hits!

A traditional Russian salad served in a sushi-like manner at café Schisliva in Moscow.

A traditional Russian salad served in a sushi-like manner at café Schisliva in Moscow.

1.       The big comeback of traditional Russian cuisine.  More and more restaurants in Moscow are offering traditional Russian dishes as part of their mixed European menus or as the main thing. Thanks to the trend, more visitors to the Russian capital, and even locals, have a chance to rediscover real Russian food and learn that there’s more to it than kasha and blini (the famous borsch is, in fact, a Ukrainian special). Some places stick to the classic recipes and offer authentic botvinia (green vegetable soup with fish), pastille (prune-coconut-honey confections) – not to be confused with zefir (meringue-style confections) and sbiten (a honey-based traditional drink), while others get creative and serve common dishes in very experimental  ways – think of a classic Selyodka Pod Shuboi salad (commonly known as “Herring Under a Fur Coat”) made to look like the ever popular sushi (photo above). [Read more…]

The Good Food Awards Marketplace

Good Food Awards 2014

The Good Food Awards, held in San Francisco each year and put on by Seedling Projects, is a gathering of some of the nation’s most delicious and authentic food producers who generously share their wares. Judging across a wide range of categories – beer, charcuterie, cheese, chocolate, coffee, confections, oils, pickles, preserves and spirits – the awards honor producers around the country who meet specific criteria based on an extensive set of principles put together by The Good Food Awards Committee including:  [Read more…]

Best Food City in the World Nomination #1: Hong Kong

Ketchum has offices in 68 countries around the world and that provides our global network of food lovers with plenty of healthy, fun competition about which city has the best food, chefs, and home cooks. This week @ppetite challenged employees to a Culinary Face-Off explaining why their city deserves the honor of being called The World’s Best Food City. Today’s post comes from Thomas Kwan who makes a good case for Hong Kong. If you think that your city deserves the title, please send your post and photos to amy.kull@ketchum.com. Let the competition begin!

Hong Kong calls itself “Asia’s World City” for a good reason. It can be considered the capital for any type of cuisine you can imagine, from side street snack shops selling curry flavored fish balls, to Michelin 3-star restaurants serving the finest French cuisine. Of course, there are delicacies in between that locals and tourists should not miss. Here are some of my favorites:

There’s nothing more comforting than hot pot, an Asian dish that is sort of like fondue but made in a much larger vessel. It features a wide variety of soup bases and ingredients from which to choose, but beef is the essential hot pot ingredient. Head down to ChaosHotPoter and be sure to ask Ted to help you pair your beef slices with a nice bottle of red wine. Megan’s Kitchen also offers a range of beef cuts for your indulgence.

Photo courtesy: www.sassyhongkong.com

Photo courtesy: www.sassyhongkong.com

[Read more…]