Top 10 Food & Dining Trends in Moscow

Editor’s Note: While most of the world debates the likely medalists at the Sochi Games, we foodies will be asking an equally important question. Tell us, tell us PLEASE, what in the heck is everyone eating over there and how can we replicate it at home? Our Ketchum colleagues graciously obliged our tantrums and now you, too, can be in-the-know if someone asks you to bring some “Herring Under a Fur Coat” to their Opening Ceremony party. I hope you’ll enjoy learning more about Russian cuisine today and in the weeks to come. Amy

2013 was a remarkable year in the world of food and dining in Moscow and people are still talking about food trend predictions for 2014. We are no astrologists, so instead spent the past days examining the current top 10 trends in Russian food and dining. Who knows? With a little help from the Sochi Olympics, some predictions might become the next global hits!

A traditional Russian salad served in a sushi-like manner at café Schisliva in Moscow.

A traditional Russian salad served in a sushi-like manner at café Schisliva in Moscow.

1.       The big comeback of traditional Russian cuisine.  More and more restaurants in Moscow are offering traditional Russian dishes as part of their mixed European menus or as the main thing. Thanks to the trend, more visitors to the Russian capital, and even locals, have a chance to rediscover real Russian food and learn that there’s more to it than kasha and blini (the famous borsch is, in fact, a Ukrainian special). Some places stick to the classic recipes and offer authentic botvinia (green vegetable soup with fish), pastille (prune-coconut-honey confections) – not to be confused with zefir (meringue-style confections) and sbiten (a honey-based traditional drink), while others get creative and serve common dishes in very experimental  ways – think of a classic Selyodka Pod Shuboi salad (commonly known as “Herring Under a Fur Coat”) made to look like the ever popular sushi (photo above). [Read more…]